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Special Issue: Nonviolent Approaches to Security

Click here to download the PDF version of the Special Issue Dear Readers, We are pleased to present our special issue on nonviolent approaches to security in collaboration with Nonviolent Peaceforce. This issue focuses on nonviolent, civilian-led strategies for protection and violence prevention in various violent contexts, ranging from civil … Read more

Two women sit conversing in the morning sun in Bhaktapur, Nepal.

The Role of Civil Society in Monitoring Ceasefires

Civil society ceasefire monitoring can address risks to ceasefire implementation

How A Feminist Ethic of Care Can Inform Feminist Foreign Policy

This analysis summarizes and reflects on the following research: Robinson, F. (2021). Feminist foreign policy as ethical foreign policy? A care ethics perspective. Journal of International Political Theory, 17(1), 20-37. Talking Points  Mainstream approaches to feminist foreign policy may actually reinforce “gender power relations and Western liberal modes of domination” … Read more

Hero-Villain Narratives Prominent in U.S. Call-to-Arms Speeches

Narratives about national security, namely those identifying specific security threats, are highly influential in generating support for military action. In studying American call-to-arms speeches, Alexandra Homolar finds that hero-villain narratives are prominent in U.S. security discourse “from Samuel Adams to Donald Trump,” and are effectively used by political leaders because of their emotional appeal to the public.

The Entanglement of Militarism and Humanitarianism Broadens the Geographies of Violence

Militarism and humanitarianism produce and justify political violence that go beyond established conflict zones or battlefields.

Reimagining Peace as a Rejection of a Militarized Status Quo 

Feminist and queer perspectives on peace challenge binary ways of thinking about peace, thereby contributing to a reimagination of what peace means.

How (Invisible) Racism Shapes U.S.-South Korea Military Relations

As a project of transnational militarism, the deployment of the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense System (THAAD) in South Korea demonstrates the invisible working of race and class hierarchies through othering North Korea as the “red enemy” and imposing the unequal burden of hosting the missile defense system on lower-class marginalized rural communities.

The Problem with Inclusion in Peacemaking Theory and Practice

A relational approach to peacemaking is better equipped to address underlying social and political conditions that fuel conflict.

Awareness of the Specific Harm Caused by Nuclear Weapons Reduces Americans’ Support for Their Use

Vivid information about the consequences of a nuclear attack reduced Americans’ support for the use of nuclear weapons on both moral and self-interested grounds.

Racism as a Foundation of the Modern World

Race and racism, empire, and slavery are foundations of the European- and American-led contemporary world order, as demonstrated by the transatlantic slave trade, racist views held by Western philosophers, and the “standard of civilization” principle. 

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